Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 12th Nanotechnology Products and Summit Melbourne, Australia.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Nano Summit 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fatemeh Bahadori photo
Biography:

Fatemeh Bahadori has completed her PhD at Istanbul Technical University, Department of Organic Chemistry. She has had a year of assistant ship at University of Ilinois at Chicago, The U.S.A during her course of Ph.D. studies. She is Assistant Professor at Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul-Turkey since 2014. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals, 2 chapters in international books and has edited a special issue with special emphasis on Nano Drug Delivery systems in an internationally indexed journal.

Abstract:

During the last decades delivering biologically active molecules using nano materials (nano drug delivery systems; NDDS), have gained increasing attention in a wide range of applications from sensing and imaging to treatment of disease. The superior properties of nano materials provide numerous feasibilities such as controlling the release of drugs, targeting and imaging of cancer tumors, increasing serum half-life of bioactive molecules, passing over Blood Brain Barrier etc. Targeting cancer tumor is the area, which has attracted the greatest interest. By targeting cancer side, it is possible to obtain a better efficacy with a lower dose of the chemotherapeutic agent. However, this would be possible only if the material used in synthesis of nano-drug delivery system is both biocompatible and biodegradable.

Nano-micelles made of amphiphilic materials are superior in all above-mentioned properties compared to other NDDS. They simultaneously form in aqueous media and this provides easy production especially in industrial scale. However, their application has been associated with some stability problems and not all amphiphilic materials are non-toxic. According to our studies, natural materials show the best toxicity profile in vivo and it is possible to enhance their stability using some other natural products as well. In this presentation, we will discuss synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of micelles made of organic natural materials such as phospholipids, chitosan and glycolipids. We also will compare their cytotoxicity and genotoxicity compared to synthetic polymers.

Keynote Forum

Dror Fixler

Faculty of Engineering and Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University,Israel.

Keynote: Nano-theranostics with plasmonic nanoparticles

Time : 11:20-12:05

OMICS International Nano Summit 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dror Fixler photo
Biography:

Dror Fixler received his Ph.D. degree in 2003 from the Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Israel. He is a member of the Faculty of Engineering and the Nano center of Bar-Ilan University. He has published over 70 original research papers and holds over 11 issued patents. His research interests include fluorescence measurements (FLIM and anisotropy decay), optical super resolution, high-end electro-optical system engineering and light-tissue interaction. Dr. Fixler received several international awards and organized and presented at over 20 international conferences.

Abstract:

Current medical treatments are largely based on statistics and time. In our talk we will present highly efficient probes describing patient-specific in vivo disease behaviors and therapy responses. Our method is based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs) that bind to fluorescent molecules and other chemical molecules. Using the plasmon properties of the GNPs, we control the optical signals obtainable from our constructs so that they will be able to respond to their surroundings in a sensitive manner. In addition in this method we will image our constructs using several modalities to emphasize their usefulness for in vivo detection in a variety of exciting biological research topics.

In our talk we will show several empanels aiming to present a new, simple and non-invasive method to detect, locate, and to treat several diseases. One example will be detection and treatment of atherosclerosis (AS) at its very early stages. We use GNPs combined with the diffusion reflection (DR) method to demonstrate the detection of vulnerable AS plaques. Our method is based on the fact that macrophages are a major component in the vulnerable plaque and are able to uptake metal nanoparticles that can be discovered by the DR system. In addition, it is well known that high density lipoprotein (HDL) reduces AS. Thus, the specific treatment of AS is presented, as the GNPs serve as drug carriers of HDL. Early and accurate non-invasive detection of AS plaques by DR method and GNPs may allow serially monitoring the rate of disease progression and thus tailoring therapeutic measures accordingly.

OMICS International Nano Summit 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tsung-Yen Tsai photo
Biography:

Tsung-Yen Tsai has completed her PhD from Texas A&M University in 1996. She worked for ITRI, Taiwan for 6 years as the division director and then transferred to Chung Yuan Christian University since 2002.  She is the distinguished professor of Chemistry department. She has published more than 45 papers in SCIjournals, over 35 patents and has been serving as the project director to develop the pilot of new nanocomposites, cooperated with more than 30 companies.

Abstract:

PET is hydrophobic and semicrystalline polyester due to the presence of the aromatic ring in the polymeric structure.  It shows high melting point and very good mechanical strength even numerous excellent properties such as good flexibility, thermal stability, fatigue resistance, high crystal-melting temperature, and low cost, etc. In recent years there is an increasing interest for the preparation of PET nanocomposites due to there extensive properties. The main industrial PET production is usually carried out two ways (a) bis-(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalate (BHET) oligomerization, (b) esterification of terephthalic acid (TPA) or dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) with ethylene glycol (EG) by zinc or manganese acetate or Antimony compound as a catalyst. However, residual heavy-metal catalysts in PET products are harmful to the health, particularly when used in food or beverage packaging. Thus, without addition of the heavy-metal catalyst, the development of a new method for the rapid polymerization of PET synthesis is desirable. Fortunately, organically modified nanofillers (LDHs) provide an opportunity to solve the above mentioned problems. According to our previous research, we developed organo-modified various LDH used as a new catalyst without heavy metals to prepare new type of PET nanocomposites by in-situ preparation method. PET/LDH nanocomposite morphologies were determined by XRD, TEM. TEM and are exfoliated and intercalated with the layer by the PET molecules during in situ polymerization with various LDHs. This effect could be attributed to the better thermos mechanical, gas barrier properties of PET/LDH nanocomposites.

 

  • Track:1 Advanced Nanomaterials

Session Introduction

Shachar Richter

Associate professor

Title: Bio and molecular electronics: Materials and devices
Speaker
Biography:

Shachar Richter has completed his PhD at the Weizmann Institute of Science, and postdoctoral studies at Bell-Labs USA where he got a position as a staff member. In 2003 he joined the school of Chemistry at Tel-Aviv university and from 2013 he is an associate professor at the Department of materials science and engineering. Prof. Richter is the head of the Largest MSc program in material science in Israel, and the president of the Israel Vacuum Society. His research interests are molecular and bioelectronics, biocomposites and nanophotonics. He has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals and several patents, some of them are in commercialization process.    

Abstract:

In bio-electronics one attempts to explore the nature of conductivity in biological systems such as DNA, Peptide and proteins. Since some of these macromolecules are relatively large and can be attached to metal leads, one can investigate their electrical properties in the solid-phase and construct nano-sized devices in which the biological layers serve as the active part of the device.In this talk I will describe our experimental approaches to bio- electronics and bio-optoelectronics materials and devices.Specifically several examples will be shown: (i) Engineered Light-emitting biomaterials, which are made using the efficient nanometric separation in certain type of proteins, (ii) Control over the electrical properties of nano-sized junctions via “natural” and site-controlled doping of proteins monolayers, and (iv) construction and operation of reliable and reproducible bio-transistors.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Nasim Amiralian is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, University of Queensland. Her research themes include the processing and structure-property performance of novel nanomaterials, and renewable-based polymers and nanocomposites. One of her key research aims is to translate the strong fundamental science and engineering taking place in her research towards validated value propositions and commercial applications. Currently, her research program has predominately focused on the processing and optimisation of cellulose nanofibres and also investigations into various applications of nanocellulose such as elastomeric composites, non-woven filtration media, and renewable carbon fibre and their translation into commercial applications.

Abstract:

Cellulose is the most abundant natural polymer on earth, and its nanoscale fibres have rapidly gained prominence as high-performance nanomaterials for many applications, due to their sustainability, renewability, tunable surface chemistry, superb mechanical properties, cost-effectiveness and many health and safety benefits. Cellulose nanofibrils represent the most sought after sustainable nanomaterials of our time, with one recent conservative nanocellulose market report predicting that the North American market alone will reach US$250 million by 2020, and that global production will ramp up from approximately 350 metric tonnes today to 3500 metric tonnes by 2017. In 2013 our team discovered1-3 unique high aspect ratio (length-to-diameter) cellulose nanofibrils extracted from ‘spinifex’, an Australian native arid grass. This was done using a mild pulping procedure and low mechanical energy. This novelty means that spinifex has the potential to directly address the current technological bottlenecks that have so far limited the widespread translation of nanocellulose technology. The presentation will give an overview of our group research and technology development activities related to spinifex nanofibers, with potential applications including filtration membranes, polymer composites and low cost, renewable carbon fibres.

Biography:

 

Hackjin Kim has completed his PhD from the University of Illinois and joined the Chungnam National University after postdoctoral studies at the Stanford University. He has interests in the study of the dynamics of various condensed phases.

Abstract:

We have studied the agglomeration dynamics of magnetite ferrofluid under the magnetic field by measuring the temporal change of the magnetic weight. As the magnetic nanoparticles agglomerate at the bottom of the sample container by magnetic field, the magnetic weight increases by the stretched exponential, m(t) = m(¥) +[m(0) – m(¥)] exp[-(t/t)b] where 0 < b < 1. The stretched exponential dynamics is observed when the activation energy involved in the dynamics is not a single value but has some distribution. The distribution function of the activation energy can be determined by the inverse Laplace transformation of the time dependence of the dynamics if the pre-exponential factor of the rate constant is known. The dynamics of the magnetic weight change is observed to be sensitive to the temperature, which is explained well as thermodynamic effects. The magnetic weight decreases with the temperature rise because the structure of the agglomerate is perturbed by thermal motions of the constituent nanoparticles. The agglomeration dynamics varies depending on the shape of the sample container. Analysis of the dynamics indicates that the distribution function of the activation energy makes blue shift and becomes broader during the agglomeration. The sample in a conical container shows the much more significant change of the distribution function than that in a container with flat bottom.

  • Track 2: Nanomaterials Fabrication, Characterization and Tools
Speaker
Biography:

Shien Ping Feng is an Assistant Professor in the department of Mechanical Engineering at Hong Kong University. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from National Tsing-Hua University (2003-2008), and was a postdoctoral associate at MIT (2009-2011) prior to his appointment at Hong Kong University. He was a principal engineer, section manager and technical manager at Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (2001-2008), and a deputy director at Tripod Research Center (2008-2009). His current research is focused on electrochemical processing and interfacial characterization of nanostructured materials, and their applications on energy conversion and storage.

Abstract:

We present a new electrochemical approach to convert a bulk thin Ag film into japonica-like Ag flowers by using a combination of 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS) layer and cyclic sweeping potential (CSP). An intact bulk Ag layer is electroplated on MPS-grafted substrate, and then a CSP treatment is applied to the Ag-coated substrate in a weak alkaline electrolyte of CH3COONa, NiSO4, and Na2SO4. The flower-like Ag nanocrystals can be effectively produced via manipulation of potential waveform and scan rate of CSP. This method is readily extended to other metals or bimetallic system, such as Cu and Ag-Cu. This finding may open up a new route to effectively synthesize metal and bimetallic NCs with various shapes and versatile functionalities. In this work, the flower-like Ag NCs are chosen to demonstrate as high-sensitive electrode in the application of noninvasive/non-enzymatic electrochemical glucose biosensors. The 3D flower-like Ag NCs with high densities of stepped atoms exhibit extraordinarily enhanced electrocatalytic activity to glucose, which achieve a record low detection limit of 0.1 nM.

Speaker
Biography:

Nantankan Muensit received her B.Sc. degree from Prince of Songkla University in 1983 and M.Sc. degree from Chulalongkorn University in 1986. In 1999, she obtained a Ph.D. degree in Material Physics from Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. She has been a faculty member at Prince of Songkla University since 1987 and became an Associate Professor in 2004. Her research interest is about the piezoelectric materials and their challenging applications. Her publications including books and patents comprise more than 100 papers in various refereed journals and conference proceedings. A group of multidiscipline researchers and graduate students under Center of Excellence in Nanotecnology for Energy has been conducted by her since 2013.

 

Abstract:

Power harvesting density has been observed for polyurethane (PU) with different aggregations of hard segments. It is promising for energy conversion in a low frequency range. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-haxafluoropropylene or (P(VDF-HFP) is comparatively studied with PU. However, P(VDF-HFP) is more attractive in view of cost (»0.3 USD/g). Its potential for mechanical-electrical energy conversion without external voltage source has been discovered. Electrostriction is a key phenomena for both PU and P(VDF-HFP). The electric-field induced strain has been explored and discussed mainly in this presentation in order to promote the fabrication and applications of these smart polymers as nanogenerators.

  • Track 3: Nanotechnology in Medicine
Biography:

Merfat Algethami graduated with a Masters degree in Medical Physics from Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in 2012. In 2013, she started PhD degree in the discipline of Medical Radiations at the School of Health and Biomedical sciences at RMIT University. The focus of her research is radiation dose enhancement by bismuth-based nanoparticles.

 

Abstract:

The application  of nano-materials  and  nanoparticles  for medical  imaging,  including computed tomography (CT) imaging, promises to overcome many of the shortcomings of traditional contrast media. In addition, nanoparticles have been shown to enhance the delivered dose in external beam radiotherapy. The optimal nanoparticulate agents need to have a high X-ray attenuation and absorption coefficients, low toxicity, a long blood circulation time, and be cost effective [1, 2]. The purpose of this research is to develop a nanoparticle theranostic agent and test it in currently used clinical procedures, including: (i) diagnostic CT imaging in order to enhance the device sensitivity and local CT numbers through enhancement of the target absorption, increasing the chance of identifying diseases, and; (ii) radiotherapy in order to enhance the effects of radiations on the target tissue. In this study we use bismuth sulfide nanoparticles (Bi2S3 NPs) that are non-toxic and one of the least expensive heavy metal-based nanoparticles. In addition, Bi2S3 NPs improve X-ray attenuation and absorption, making them promising theranostic agents[3]. In this presentation, we will focus on the synthesis and characterisation of the Bi2S3 NPs, as well as their cytotoxicity with lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549). The Bi2S3  NPs and conventional iodinated contrast agents were evaluated and compared for contrast enhancement at an X-ray tube potential of 140 kVp. The dose enhancing effects of Bi2S3 NPs on A549 cells were examined at KV and MV energies. The preliminary results reveal that Bi2S3 NPs possess superior attenuation with CT compared to iodine contrast reagents. The NPs also show radio-sensitisation with cells, displaying dose enhancement at the KV range of X-ray energies and also, to a lesser degree, at the MV ranges. Therefore, Bi2S3 NPs can be considered as valuable theranostic agents.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Yen-Ho Lai has attended his PhD at the age of 24 years from National Chiao Tung University in  Department of Materials Science and Engineering. He is maior in biomaterial. He has published 2 papers in reputed journals.
 

Abstract:

Neutron capture therapy (NCT) had been demonstrated a non-invasive approach for the selective destruction of cancer cells by radiations emitted from nonradioactive NCT agents upon capturing thermal neutrons. In terms of the chemical agents for NCT, 6Lithium, 10Boron, 157Gadolinium, or 235Uranium nuclides have showed the ability for NCT. Besides the limited delivery of drugs across the blood brain barrier (BBB), no single compound or molecule of NCT agents will be able to target every tumor cell. Therefore, in order to move the NCT therapy to clinical application, it is mandatory to develop the other non-toxic nano-technological and/or cell-based delivery strategies to enhance the biocompatibility and accuracy of NCT for cancer treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) regarding as a cellular vehicle/vector showed a unique tumor-homing tropism for targeted delivery of anticancer substances to animal models of various tumors, including melanoma, glioblastoma, and breast cancer. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common deadly malignancy of the central nervous system. It is crucial to identify the ideal therapeutic protocols to target the tumor tissue while sparing healthy brain. In this report, we develop a MSC-based vehicles terrace that integrate the tumor homing of stem cells (MSC-PVA@fe-SSZ-Gd) and multifunctionalized core-shell Polyvinyl alcohol-derived nanocapsule strengthened by iron oxide (PVA@fe), which was equipped with interior Gd-DTPA surrounding by outer chemotherapeutic drug(Sulfasalazine). We report the first platform of GBM treatment using stem cell-oriented chaperon delivery of magnet-targeted multimodality fucoidan-derived nanoparticle incorporating with both GD-DTPA and SSZ for triple MR cancer imaging, Gd-NCT radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  • Track 4: Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment
Speaker
Biography:

Itay Levy, male, medicinal chemist, graduated with excellence from chemistry department at Bar Ilan University, B.Sc. on 2011 and M.Sc. on 2013. He started his Ph.D in Bar Ilan University on 2013, researching iron-oxide nanoparticles and its various biomedical effects and applications. Since 2011, he is collaborating with a startup company to develop a medicine for glioblastoma multiform (GBM) brain cancer, which recently has been approved for clinical trials. Now he is writing a new patent of new iron-oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

 

Abstract:

The nanoparticles’ synthesis and the anti-cancer effect: A unique type of composite multi-functional near IR (NIR) fluorescent iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (NPs) of narrow size distribution for tumor targeting and therapy have been designed and studied. These NPs were prepared by nucleation followed by controlled growth of thin films of IO onto Cy7-conjugated gelatin nuclei and coated with human serum albumin (HSA) by a thermal precipitation process. The hydrodynamic diameter of these core-shell NPs could be easily controlled by altering the precipitation reaction temperature. For targeting and an anti-cancer effect, we conjugated the Tumor Necrosis Factor Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) cytokine to the surface of the NIR fluorescent IO/HSA NPs via a polyethylene glycol (3 kDa) linker. The conjugated TRAIL exhibited enhanced and prolonged anti-cancer activity in both human glioblastoma multiforme and colon cancer cell lines. Further, the combination of these IO/HSA-TRAIL NPs with the commonly used chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin resulted in a synergistic anti-cancer effect on these cancer cell lines, both in-vitro and in-ovo. The NPs’ effect on human mesenchymal stem cell growth and differentiation: HSA coating onto the IO NPs enables conjugation of the IO/HSA NPs to various biomolecules including proteins, for example fibroblast growth factor  (FGF2), for biomedical applications. We examined the biological activity of the conjugated FGF2 on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). FGF2 enhances the proliferation of hBM-MSCs and stimulates promotes their differentiation toward neuronal, adipogenic and osteogenic lineages in-vitro. Covalent conjugation of the FGF2 to the IO/HSA NPs significantly stabilized this growth factor against various enzymes and inhibitors existing in serum and in tissue cultures. Conjugated FGF2 enhanced clonal expansion capacity of hBM-MSCs to a higher extent compared with the free growth factor.

Speaker
Biography:

Chia Yu from National Chiao Tung University in  Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Abstract:

Traditional micelles composed of amphiphilic molecules caused low drug loading and less drug stability. To improve the limitation, additionally lipid shell as stabilized to encapsulate micelle can improve high drug leakage and instability resulted from the drug only entrapped in the matrix of amphiphilic polymer. In this study, it was attempted to develop a lecithin stabilized micellar drug delivery system (LSM) for enhancing therapeutic efficacy and minimizing systemic toxicity of docetaxel (DTX).

A novel lecithin stabilized micellar docetaxel (LSMD) was prepared by firstly forming a thin film of self assembling micelles containing DTX and subsequently hydrated with lecithin nanosuspension. The physical characteristics of optimized LSMD revealed in Fig 1(A) were summarized as the following: mean size<200nm; encapsulation efficiency>90%; drug loading>5%; stability after reconstitution at RT and 4 oC was >8 hs and >48 hs, respectively. The drug release profiles in Fig 1(B)

shows that DTX released from LSMD was slower than that of Tynen (DTX solvent-based formulation) in PBS buffer containing 0.5% Tween 80. LSMD further shows better cytotoxicity than Tynen for CT26 in cell viability assay. The immunofluorescence staining assay indicated that the alpha-tubulin in DU145 treated with LSMD obviously was polymerized and the nucleus was fragmented. The in vivo antitumor efficacy of LSMD was evaluated in the C26 tumor-bearing mice mode. The Fig 1(C) demonstrated LSMD are more efficacious than Tynen. In vivo study, treatment with LSMD leads to high drug accumulation in tumor and maximal tolerance dose was two folds higher than Tynen.

In conclusion, lecithin stabilized micellar (LSM) drug delivery systems could be a potential carrier for delivering hydrophobic chemotherapeutic agent that could enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy and reduced toxicity

  • Track 8: Molecular Nanotechnology
Speaker
Biography:

 

Noraini Ahmad received her PhD degree in Physical Chemistry from University of Malaya, Malaysia. She went for a research attachment at the IQAC-CSIC, Barcelona, Spain in 2010 and 2011 funded by InForm Project, EU-FP7 and Ministry of Higher Education Malaysia (MOHE), respectively. Currently, she is a senior lecturer and final year project coordinator at the Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya. She is a principal investigator and co-investigator of several research grants and has won several awards locally and internationally. Her research interests are focussed on colloidal chemistry, liquid crystal and nanotechnology formulation for many practical applications.

 

Abstract:

Synthetic glycolipids have attracted a great deal of attention due to their biosurfactant properties, biocompatibility, biodegradability, nonionic nature and its ability to mimic the natural glycolipids which are difficult to extract and require high cost. Glycolipids are amphiphilic surfactants which have the ability to self-assemble and thus have high potential to be used as drug carrier systems. In this research, the liquid crystalline and self-assembly properties of branched-chain glycolipid namely 2-hexyldecyl(/α)-D–glucoside (2-HDG) have been investigated. The liquid crystalline phase behaviour of this 2-HDG has been studied through thermal transitions by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and under thermotropic and lyotropic conditions by optical polarizing microscope (OPM) and further confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Due to its amphiphilic characteristic, 2-HDG formed a focal conic texture of columnar phase thermotropically, whereas inverted hexagonal dispersions (hexosomes) have been observed in binary aqueous media. The critical aggregation concentrations (CAC) were studied for the glycolipid surfactant and mixed surfactants systems of glycolipid and Tween series. The results exhibited that the addition of co-surfactant to the glycolipids dispersions has reduced the CAC value of 2-HDG, thus making the system more stable. The CAC values decreased in the order of 2-HDG > 2HDG-Tween 20 > 2HDG-Tween 40 > 2HDG-Tween 60 > 2HDG-Tween 80. The formations of 2-HDG and 2-HDG-Tween hexosomes were further investigated in terms of their particles size and morphology. Thus, this branched-chain glycolipid provided an alternative nonionic surfactant with interesting phase behaviour and high potential nanoparticles (hexosomes) which could be used as drug carrier systems in the future.

  • Track 9: Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery
Speaker
Biography:

Ravish J. Patel is working as assistant professor in Ramanbhai Patel College of Pharmacy. He is pursuing his PhD from Charotar University of Science and Technology, Changa. He has published 06 papers in reputed journals like journal of controlled release, current drug delivery etc.

Abstract:

Background: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a motor neuron disease (MND), is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deterioration of both upper and lower motor neurons. Only one drug (riluzole) has been approved for the treatment of ALS. Riluzole is a BCS class II drug having 60% absolute bioavailability. It is a substrate of P-glycoprotein and BBB restricts its entry in brain.

Objective: This investigation was aimed to develop O/W nanoemulsion system of riluzole to improve its brain bioavailability.

Methods: Riluzole loaded nanoemulsion was prepared by phase titration method. It was consisting of 3% w/w Sefsol 218, 28.3% w/w Tween 80:Carbitol (1:1) and 68.7% w/w water. It was characterized for globule size, globule size distribution, transmittance, viscosity, pH, zeta potential, conductivity and nasal ciliotoxicity study. Thermodynamic stability and room temperature stability of prepared nanoemulsion formulation were evaluated. Pharmacokinetic and brain uptake study was carried out using albino rats (wistar) post intranasal and oral administration.

Results: Riluzole loaded nanoemulsion was having a globule size of 23.92±0.52 nm. It was free from nasal ciliotoxicity and stable for three months. Brain uptake of riluzole post intranasal administration of riluzole loaded nanoemulsion was significantly (P <4.10 × 10-6) higher when it was compared with oral administration of riluzole loaded nanoemulsion.

Conclusion: This study indicates that nanoemulsion of riluzole for intranasal administration could be a promising approach for the treatment of ALS to minimize the dose of riluzole in order to avoid dose related adverse events.

  • Track 10: Bio Nanotechnology
Biography:

Hackjin Kim has completed his PhD from the University of Illinois and joined the Chungnam National University after postdoctoral studies at the Stanford University. He has interests in the study of the dynamics of various condensed phases.

 

Abstract:

We have studied the agglomeration dynamics of magnetite ferrofluid under the magnetic field by measuring the temporal change of the magnetic weight. As the magnetic nanoparticles agglomerate at the bottom of the sample container by magnetic field, the magnetic weight increases by the stretched exponential, m(t) = m(¥) +[m(0) – m(¥)] exp[-(t/t)b] where 0 < b < 1. The stretched exponential dynamics is observed when the activation energy involved in the dynamics is not a single value but has some distribution. The distribution function of the activation energy can be determined by the inverse Laplace transformation of the time dependence of the dynamics if the pre-exponential factor of the rate constant is known. The dynamics of the magnetic weight change is observed to be sensitive to the temperature, which is explained well as thermodynamic effects. The magnetic weight decreases with the temperature rise because the structure of the agglomerate is perturbed by thermal motions of the constituent nanoparticles. The agglomeration dynamics varies depending on the shape of the sample container. Analysis of the dynamics indicates that the distribution function of the activation energy makes blue shift and becomes broader during the agglomeration. The sample in a conical container shows the much more significant change of the distribution function than that in a container with flat bottom.

  • Track 14: Nano Electronics
  • Track 11: Nano Products
  • Track 5: Nanotechnology in Tissue Engineering